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525 Short St., Columbus, OH 43215

(614) 464-2739

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Media Reviews for CBC Restaurant

Below are some of the wonderful things that have been said about us in the media.

 

Columbus Alive - Restaurant review: Columbus Brewing Company Restaurant

by G. A. Benton, October 6, 2016

The Columbus Brewing Company Restaurant has nothing to do with the Columbus Brewing Company. No, I haven’t knocked back a few too many at the Columbus Brewing Company.

In a hard-to-crack nutshell, the two Columbus Brewing Company entities are separate businesses that once inhabited the same building. After the eponymous brewery moved to bigger digs and a new tenant called Commonhouse Ales assumed the brewing space in July, the restaurant neglected to change its name. (As a concession, the website favors CBC Restaurant.)

Not much else has changed at the eatery over the years, either, but that’s not a bad thing.

It’s retained the same upbeat and roomy, red-flaunting interior with woodsy accents. The same — possibly ironic — 1980s-leaning rock ’n’ roll soundtrack plays. And a wall of windows continues to connect the popular block O-shaped bar to the covered patio, which frequently attracts big parties.

Best of all, friendly servers still deliver the place’s familiar, jazzed-up comfort food, which is often boosted by Latin and Southwestern flourishes.

There’s still plenty of beer, too. Most pints are $6, including the widely revered Bodhi from, well, the Columbus Brewing Company.

For beverages made on-site, Commonhouse Ales provides a crisp session IPA called Summer Sesh, plus Hoptopus, a refreshing pale wheat. The latter is easy on the clove and medicinal flavors often associated with wheat beers.

These go great with a virtual mountain of the top-notch Pub Nachos ($11.95). Carefully assembled so the abundant chorizo, black beans, house beer-cheese sauce, smoked chili sauce and pico de gallo are evenly distributed, they’re among the best in town.

For an appetizer that’s less of a meal, try the Asparagus Fries ($8.95). Simplicity is their allure: crisp, non-greasy, beer-batter jackets encasing thin, al dente spears that snap with a pleasant crunch. The side of sriracha ranch adds richness with a kick.

“Richness with a kick” could describe many items, including soups and salads. Crumbled gorgonzola cheese contributes a contrasting creaminess to a bowl of zesty Roasted Tomato Soup du jour ($5.95). Jalapenos plus Mexican street-food toppings supplied zip to the creamy dressing on a nightly special Elote Caesar Salad, embellished with Ohio sweet corn ($7).

A dinner of boneless chicken breast, potatoes and corn might sound boring, but it’s a flavorful texture-fest. The golden-brown, Pecan-Crusted Chicken ($17.95) arrives with a crackly batter and straddling mounds of perfectly lumpy, fluffy mashers and buttery kernels perked up by jalapenos, poblanos and red peppers. Creamy, slightly sweet, pale-ale mustard sauce and crispy nuts are the winning, finishing touches.

“It’s so good!” the menu says about the Cajun Jambalaya ($18.95). The menu is not a liar, but it omits the fact that this dish — the Louisiana answer to paella — could feed two to three people.

Racy tomato sauce aromatized by thyme, paprika and red peppers is spiked with poblanos and cayenne. Densely populating this are good plump shrimp, chicken, discs of smoky andouille sausage, spinach and scads of salmon. The onslaught is ladled atop a heap of brown rice, and the result is the best entrée I sampled.

Even a bunch of bologna tastes great here (Triple Decker Fried Bologna Sandwich, $10.95). Sourcing helps: The garlicky meat, which recalls a good frankfurter, comes from Falter’s, a venerable Columbus company in business for over 125 years.

Searing the bologna until it’s smoky helps, too. So does placing three pieces of it on a crisp-toasted ciabatta roll with caramelized onions, piquant ale mustard and an irresistible load of melted Swiss and provolone cheeses. Like all sandwiches, it’s served with battered fries (mine were missing their advertised garlic) and mayo-heavy cole slaw.

Bottom line: This eatery’s name might have become confusing, but its bold comfort food continues to make perfect sense.

 

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10 Best Bars in the Brewery District, Columbus

The Culture Trip by By Katy Smith December, 2015

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Business First - December 18, 2015

People to Know: Jennifer Kessel-White by By Katy Smith

Jennifer Kessel-White, General manager, CBC Restaurant

How did you get into this profession? I started serving in college for the flexible hours that worked around my school schedule. I developed a passion for the hospitality industry, changed my field of study and received my degree in hospitality management.

Photograph of Jennifer Kessel-White

Columbus is becoming better known as a “foodie” city. What’s your favorite place for a special dinner? I am a vegetarian and appreciate any organic offerings, so my go-to establishment is Northstar Cafe. For a special night out, though, I am making a reservation at Milestone 229. Its wine list accompanied by its whimsical play on classic dishes draws me in.

What major change do you see for hospitality in the next five years? Full dining experiences. More guests are looking for their night out to start and end with their dining venture, where it used to be a small part of their evening. Think beer dinners, wine pairings, bourbon tastings and more. Package events and multiple-course meals are being requested more often.

What’s the industry’s greatest challenge? Staffing. Entrusting staff to care about your business and represent your brand. If a guest has a so-so meal at your place, they may come back and try another dish. But if they have a horrible service experience, they won’t return. Appreciate your quality employees.

Read in Business First

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The Columbus Dispatch - February 19, 2015

House-made Cocktails, Beers Pair with Brunch by By Nicholas Dekker

The CBC Restaurant has been operating from its little corner of the Brewery District at a steady pace. While the neighborhood has been revitalized around it, it’s continued to serve comfort foods to pair with beers made by the brewer.

The brunch menu leads off with wine, Champagne and specialty cocktails, but the first order of business should be perusing the bloody mary list (all $8). CBC Restaurant maintains a list of six bloody marys built with a house-made mix. They range from the serrano and paprika-laced “Smokey Mary” and the spicy “Mary’s Sure ‘Fire’ Cure” (with sriracha vodka) to the refreshing “Mary’s Garden” built on cucumber vodka. Even the basic “CBC Mary” hits all the right notes.

You can’t be in a brewery and not sample beer, right? The restaurant offers a sampling flight of seven beers ($10). Expect three to four house brews available on tap (with a nod to its IPAs) plus solid offerings from other Ohio breweries. The generous samples add up to a couple of pints of beer.

Appetizers address any desire for pub fare. The pretzel bread ($8.95) is a good bet — and is shareable for the whole table. The soft, salty pretzels are best with either of the house-made dips: tangy beer mustard or rich-but-not-greasy pub cheddar.

Among the entrées, it’s hard to find a misfire. The entrées include brunch favorites such as burritos ($10.95) and Belgian waffles ($9.95) to south-by-southwest classics, including huevos rancheros ($10.95) and Cajun jambalaya ($12.95). The worthy “Brewer’s Benedict” ($12.95) is built with flavorful house-made breakfast sausage and a spicy tomato hollandaise.

The chicken and waffle ($11.95) is rolled in cornflakes and served with Ohio honey butter. The breading needed more seasoning; otherwise, the tender chicken offered a savory counterpoint to the sweet waffle.

And the restaurant gets points for a creative children’s menu. Instead of bland chicken fingers, it features salads, salmon, a burger, a Belgian waffle, and biscuits and gravy.

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The Columbus Dispatch - January 16, 2014

New to the Menu | CBC Restaurant Updates Uphold Tavern’s High Standards for Quality - by John Christensen

With nine years of service under its belt, the CBC Restaurant remains one of the best combinations of bar and venue for seriously good food.

The dynamic American menu receives regular updates.

The asparagus fries ($7.95), a relatively recent addition to the starter lineup, are beer-battered, with a crisp exterior. It is a clever way to deal with out-of-season asparagus.

Like all deep-fried items on the menu, the fried flavors aren’t muted by stale oil or grease. The “fries” come with a ranch-style dressing nicely heated with Asian hot sauce.

The house salad ($5.95) has a good vinaigrette poured over the mix of greens (no iceberg), which are tossed with pitted black olives, small cubes of roasted beet, a dab of goat cheese and two large croûtons of good cornbread.

The new bourbon buffalo chicken wrap ($10.25) is a clever combination of lightly battered chicken breast fried golden-brown, chopped lettuce and scallions, cheese and bacon, plus sides of a garlic ranch dressing and a bold barbecue sauce. Perhaps best of all, it is in a ciabatta-style bun of substance.

Like all sandwiches, it is served with well-made fries that are tossed with garlic and parsley and are dangerously addictive. A well-made traditional coleslaw is served with each sandwich.

One of the most impressive new main dishes is the eggplant Napoleon ($14.95), a showcase for vegetables. The eggplant slices are simply grilled and not oily. There is also a lightly grilled cake of risotto made with carrot and parsnip pieces, a cauliflower gratin, plenty of whole-leaf spinach dressed with a balsamic vinegar reduction and a compote of chopped tomato and basil.

The dish offers an impressive quantity of boldly presented vegetables.

Another new main dish is the enchilada stack ($15.95). Much shorter than the eggplant Napoleon, it packs plenty of flavor, starting with pulled pork that has been marinated in hot pepper and lime before being cooked.

It is paired with cumin-flavored, flat-grilled chopped beef between the two layers formed by stacking three flat corn tortillas. Also featured are a moderate amount of grated cheddar cheese, a sauce made with smoked chilies and a foundation of plainly cooked black beans.

A garnish of salsa, a few slices of avocado and some sour cream finish the dish.

Pizzas have always been a mainstay at the restaurant. The newest is deliciously made with lightly smoked beef brisket ($13.50) pulled into large shreds and loaded on the pizza along with crimini mushrooms, lightly caramelized onion, and what the menu claims is smoked provolone (I couldn’t detect any smoking) punctuated with balsamic drizzle.

Those ingredients, and the good-quality, bready crust, make a satisfying meal, with the natural sweetness of the caramelized onions making a important contribution.

Fans of the restaurant’s longtime favorite dessert — upside-down banana cream pie ($5.50) — will be glad to know that it is still on the dessert list and still a great indulgence. The large mound of whipped cream is decorated with candied pecan pieces and caramel syrup.

Underneath is a mildly flavored vanilla pudding, supported by a deconstructed graham cracker crust, and surrounded by slices of banana.

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The Columbus Dispatch - January 16, 2014

New to the Menu | CBC Restaurant Updates Uphold Tavern’s High Standards for Quality - by John Christensen

With nine years of service under its belt, the CBC Restaurant remains one of the best combinations of bar and venue for seriously good food.

The dynamic American menu receives regular updates.

The asparagus fries ($7.95), a relatively recent addition to the starter lineup, are beer-battered, with a crisp exterior. It is a clever way to deal with out-of-season asparagus.

Like all deep-fried items on the menu, the fried flavors aren’t muted by stale oil or grease. The “fries” come with a ranch-style dressing nicely heated with Asian hot sauce.

The house salad ($5.95) has a good vinaigrette poured over the mix of greens (no iceberg), which are tossed with pitted black olives, small cubes of roasted beet, a dab of goat cheese and two large croûtons of good cornbread.

The new bourbon buffalo chicken wrap ($10.25) is a clever combination of lightly battered chicken breast fried golden-brown, chopped lettuce and scallions, cheese and bacon, plus sides of a garlic ranch dressing and a bold barbecue sauce. Perhaps best of all, it is in a ciabatta-style bun of substance.

Like all sandwiches, it is served with well-made fries that are tossed with garlic and parsley and are dangerously addictive. A well-made traditional coleslaw is served with each sandwich.

One of the most impressive new main dishes is the eggplant Napoleon ($14.95), a showcase for vegetables. The eggplant slices are simply grilled and not oily. There is also a lightly grilled cake of risotto made with carrot and parsnip pieces, a cauliflower gratin, plenty of whole-leaf spinach dressed with a balsamic vinegar reduction and a compote of chopped tomato and basil.

The dish offers an impressive quantity of boldly presented vegetables.

Another new main dish is the enchilada stack ($15.95). Much shorter than the eggplant Napoleon, it packs plenty of flavor, starting with pulled pork that has been marinated in hot pepper and lime before being cooked.

It is paired with cumin-flavored, flat-grilled chopped beef between the two layers formed by stacking three flat corn tortillas. Also featured are a moderate amount of grated cheddar cheese, a sauce made with smoked chilies and a foundation of plainly cooked black beans.

A garnish of salsa, a few slices of avocado and some sour cream finish the dish.

Pizzas have always been a mainstay at the restaurant. The newest is deliciously made with lightly smoked beef brisket ($13.50) pulled into large shreds and loaded on the pizza along with crimini mushrooms, lightly caramelized onion, and what the menu claims is smoked provolone (I couldn’t detect any smoking) punctuated with balsamic drizzle.

Those ingredients, and the good-quality, bready crust, make a satisfying meal, with the natural sweetness of the caramelized onions making a important contribution.

Fans of the restaurant’s longtime favorite dessert — upside-down banana cream pie ($5.50) — will be glad to know that it is still on the dessert list and still a great indulgence. The large mound of whipped cream is decorated with candied pecan pieces and caramel syrup.

Underneath is a mildly flavored vanilla pudding, supported by a deconstructed graham cracker crust, and surrounded by slices of banana.

 

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CBC Restaurant – December 31, 2013

by CMH, Gourmand

It has been over six years since I wrote about CBC Restaurant. However, It has not been 6 years since I have eaten there or even six weeks. I am also happy to report that not much has changed in six years, and that is a very good thing.

Many people do not know that Columbus Brewing Company and CBC Restaurant have different owners. Eric Bean has been brewer and owner of the Brewery for quite some time now. While the two business share a roof and a name, they are very different entities. The restaurant continues to feature and serve Columbus Brewing Company brews as well as to make the beers active ingredients in some recipes. As the Brewery has continued to expand as a business, the restaurants CBC offerings have contracted a bit. If you are a fan of CBC’s Bohdi (Double IPA) the restaurant is still one of the best places to find this award-winning beer but they also run out fairly frequently. However, there is no need to fear, the restaurant does a fine job of sourcing guest beers into their line-up with a strong focus on local breweries such as Actual Brewing Company.

As for food, Brian Cook is still in the kitchen which is good news for me and some of my favorite dishes. I think CBC Restaurant has some of the best nachos in town and if you are dining with mixed company (vegetarians and carnivores) they do a fine job of deconstructing their nachos to meet everyone’s tastes when needed. The Cuban Burrito with a mix of meats, chips and plantains remains nearly the same as the version I raved about years ago. Another favorite of mine is the beer cheese soup which is typically available in the evening is a perfect starter for a fall or evening meal. Desserts are top notch as well (insider tip: sign up for the restaurant e-mail list for a free dessert of your choice with your next meal). Another dish worth mentioning is the Bye Bye Miss American Pie: a wood-fired pizza with house-made fennel sausage, banana peppers rings, pepperoni and smoked provolone cheese.

The restaurant recently expanded hours to include Sunday Brunch so there are plenty of opportunities to see the depth of the menu the kitchen can push out. I’m happy to report that six years later that this place has retained everything that made it a great dining spot and if anything, has upped their game.

A final side note, I am slightly addicted to the house smoked chipotle sauce found on the nachos and the burrito. The restaurant partners with CaJohn’s to bottle their sauces so you can take them home with you. So there are two types of bottled products originating under the same roof.

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Columbus Alive - Brunch at CBC is great right out of the gate. May, 2013

by G. A. Benton

Changes are foaming up at the CBC Restaurant, and they are all good. Not so good is the “Lucky us, construction season is in bloom” obstacle course currently separating diners from CBC. I’m strongly advising you not to let these minor detours deter you from enjoying CBC’s great-outta-the-gate weekend brunch.

Served Saturdays and Sundays from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. (it was formerly closed then), CBC’s something-for-every-appetite brunch menu includes established popular items like burgers, seafood (lump crab, salmon, tilapia), house-roasted chicken and pulled pork plus plenty of Asian- and Cajun-inflected entree salads and sandwiches. New on that list are several Mexican-inspired and waffle-accompanied, brunch-only dishes.

Also shaking things up is a line of what I like to call Webb “It’s my first one today” Pierce libations ($8). This doesn’t mean you should resist CBC’s crisp brews, just that you might share a beer and a mixed drink with a good friend. Or yourself.

After being seated — I recommend lounging on the red and plastic-windowed, tented-from-the-elements patio — pick a starter like long, crackly beer-battered Asparagus Fries ($8, with rich Sriracha ranch sauce) then select the quaff best suiting your mood. There’s a slew of distinct, top-notch Bloody Marys to choose from like the: Chef’s — revivifying, light and starring a homemade Southwestern-ish green chili mix that’s more zesty than spicy; Smokey — rich, thick and wafting smoked paprika; Mary’s Sure “Fire” Cure — a fiery addiction that’ll melt any hangover ... and tongue.

Listed under “Fizzys,” Jimmy’s Hangover Cure looked equally promising, but reading its foofy ingredients (blueberry vodka and peach schnapps) unnerved me. Fortunately, the blueberry puree-led flavor of this pretty-in-garnet, prosecco-ed refresher resolved itself on a pleasantly bitter note.

I’m resolved to order the Chicken and Waffle again ($12). Arriving in a nutty-tasting, brunch-appropriate cornflakes batter was a perfectly fried (crunchy and un-greasy crust; juicy and tender meat) XXL-sized breast piece perched atop a thick and crispy grid-cake. This comes with a bowl of cinnamon-scented cooked apples plus genuine maple syrup; just add house hot sauce for brunchy bliss.

You could think of CBC’s Huevos Rancheros ($11) as a three layered cake in which each simple tier contributed synergistically — but definitely think of it. From top to bottom, it’s built with “frostings” of smoked chili and house cheddar cheese sauces, a cheese omelet, corn tortillas plus Southwestern-flavored black beans. Adding excellent support are redskin potatoes perked-up with peppers and onions.

That nifty “hash” likewise accompanies the pleasing if not enormous Santa Fe Breakfast Burrito ($11). It contains shaved ham, tangy cheese sauce, scramblers, tickly pico de gallo and salsa plus discs of sage-y sausage.

Juicy, comforting and big-ass bratwurst-y housemade sausage links played a major role in the winning Brewer’s Benedict ($13). While my “spiced tomato hollandaise” only tasted buttery, the two “Benedict-ized” eggs were properly poached, and I enjoyed their fluffy, homey and hefty biscuits, which stood in for industry-standard pre-made English muffins. For fun, a bowl of those fine cooked apples was included too.

For an over-the-top midday dessert that’ll push tons of sweet tooth buttons, it’s hard to beat CBC’s Mexi-Pan “Mexican French Toast.” Four puffy and eggy pan-darkened brioche slices were sprinkled with cinnamon, drizzled in caramel sauce and dolloped with whipped cream. Supplying the crowning glory — and getting your calorie count where it likes to be — was a cornflake-battered and fried (though not as crisply as that killer chicken) scoop of vanilla bean ice cream.

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614 Magazine - January 2010

by Kimberly M. Stolz

This month, Restaurant Week can be your culinary wingman. Restaurant Week can not only help you find new places, but it can also re-introduce your palate to old friends. Take the CBC Restaurant. Their seasonal Winter Warmer Ale, spiced up for the low temps with a higher alcohol content amid notes of ginger and cinnamon, is worth the visit alone.

While excellent beers are always on tap at CBC, the outstanding Restaurant Week menu price of just $30 for two diners is available for a limited time only. Dinner starts with a choice of their House or Lemon Caesar Salad. For the main course, three entrées are vying for attention, and two of the dishes are long-time patron favorites: Orange-Glazed Atlantic Salmon and Pecan-Crusted Chicken. The salmon is a lovely bit of fish, and, thankfully, Chef Brian Cook is not so besotted with his delicious glaze that he drowns the poor fillet. The glaze is citrusy, savory, and doesn't overwhelm; it hints at sweetness. Set upon a timbale of rice, with four corners of bright, tenderly crisp peppers, this colorful dish might help you forget that it's winter.

The Pecan-Crusted Chicken consists of a chicken breast duo, dressed up in pecans and crispy along the edges, for that great texture-twist of tender and crunchy. An ice cream scoop of buttermilk mashers corrals any wandering Ohio Honey Wheat mustard sauce. I like to go "old school" with a plate like this - a fork full of chicken, taters, and the sweet corn side all adds up to a mouthful of comfort.

Making its debut on the Restaurant Week menu is Chef's homemade Sausage and Pepper Linguini. The sausage is so delightfully tangy with fennel that you'd never guess a vegetarian chef put the flavorful meaty dish together. The sausage plays well with the marinara and fresh linguini, hand-made by locals Pasta di Toni.

To top it all off, the menu includes a dessert to share for you and your dining partner: either Upside-Down Banana Cream Pie or Baby Key Lime Pie.

With the impressive trio of entree choices, you have no excuse not to re-acquaint yourself with Columbus Brewing Company. The great beer is always there, but you'll want to catch this awesome deal while it lasts.

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Fresh Look: A New Review Of An Old Favorite - Columbus Monthly, May 2008

by John Marshall

When the Columbus Brewing Company opened in 1997 as part of the burgeoning Cameron Mitchell empire, it was a quick success. It featured well-prepared and boldly flavored food and excellent selection of brewed-on-the-premises beers.

In January 2007, Mike Campbell and Doug Griggs purchased the restaurant and wisely decided not to mess with the formula. In fact, with executive chef Brian Cook at the helm, CBC is better than ever.

My favorite thing on the menu was not beer food, but the roasted chicken salad. A base of romaine was littered with chunks of tasty roasted white meat, olives, dates, pine nuts, grape tomatoes, soft cornbread croutons and bits of tangy white goat cheese-with a slightly sweetened sherry vinaigrette. It’s a full (and kind of healthful) meal. The rest of the salads were worth eating too, including a decent Caesar and one with romaine, mesclun, cucumbers, onions and red peppers topped with feta cheese and slices of smoked salmon.

The hearty French onion soup, full of sweet caramelized onions, was terrific with a dark beer. Other starters included a seared rare yellowfin tuna that was nicely paired with apricot ale mustard and wasabi.

A lot of hearty sandwiches were available, from an OK pulled pork (this is not a barbecue place) to an excellent blackened tilapia. I also highly recommend the slightly oily but delicious garlic fries served with any sandwich. The combination of tilapia, fries and and India Pale Ale was pub food at its best.

Main Dishes of notes were the rich and spicy Low Country Shrimp and Grits and the yummy Cuban roasted chicken with black beans and fried plantains (my favorite entrée). There also were good pizza selections, from pepperoni to one with jerk chicken and corn salsa.

The big desserts were a little much, but there’s no arguing with the delicious Upside-Down Banana Cream pie-a massive thing of custard, whipped cream, bananas and caramel sauce. Also worth trying is the warm blueberry bread pudding with white and milk chocolate and ice cream.

About the beer, of course: The menu recommends one of the several house brews for most dishes, but not for the onion soup for some reason (I direct you to the Porter). The suggested beers I sampled were spot-on.

Especially wonderful was the popular Columbus Pale Ale. Brewmaster Eric Bean really knows his stuff. (The only one I can’t recommend is Apricot Ale, but only because of a personal prejudice against turning any good alcoholic beverage into something that tastes like soda pop.)

The service was quite good – because one of the owners usually was prowling about. These are nice folks who do their jobs well.

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Columbus Alive, Thursday, May 1, 2008

THE BAR EXAM: Have you been dying for a top-shelf margarita but your beer buddies are always zeroing in on top-notch suds? Or maybe you like more soothing orange juices and less acidic lime squeezings in your adult Mexican beverage. Then again, are you the type of clever contrarian to uncover a terrific fish dish on a steakhouse menu? If any of these describes you, then zoom on down to the Columbus Brewing Company. MORE

ESTA CASA ES SU CASA: Whether sitting under the alluring covered patio or at the breezy, rectangular red bar surrounded by light-leaking windows, the stylish but unstuffy CBC is a pleasant place to grab a made-here brew and bite. But I bet few people know they also make a great margarita.

TABLE OF THE COCKTAIL: You don’t have to have a million bucks to get one of CBC’s Millionaire Margaritas – but you will need $9. That’s because CBC’s bartenders squeeze to order the juices of one lime and one orange. Then they add expensive Grand Marnier, Gran Centenario tequila and a splash of house-made sour mix. Do not cringe at the mention of sour mix – which too often means sweet mix – because the addition of CBC’s mix does not subtract from the great taste of the margarita. The result is a distinct drink that lets the lime have a say even while the orange flavors do most of the talking.

MARGARITA MUNCHIES: The Millionaire Margarita is an excellent complement to CBC’s appetizers – half-priced during happy hour. So order up some calamari in a garlicky and sweet Thai chili sauce, some pepper-rimmed rare tuna with a nice Asian slaw, and one of the better quesadillas around, made with chicken and andouille sausage.

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Columbus Alive, November 8, 2007

by G. A. Benton

What's more, CBC sports a beer-friendly, something-for-everyone menu rife with smoky and spicy fare. CBC seems out to prove you can have your craft beer and eat a nice meal too.

Columbus Brewing Company conducts one of the best happy hours in Columbus, with reduced beer tariffs and half-priced appetizers ($4-$5)

And revisiting CBC is certainly no chore, not with its futuristic, industrial exterior that yields to a laidback and duskily lit copper and red interior flaunting an unusual tree leitmotif. There's also a large, almost Block-O-like red lacquered bar, the always friendly staff and those fab-tasting suds complementing high-performing brewpub grub. See, there is life beyond McPreFab chow and Corporate Lite.

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C-Bus Magazine, September/October, 2007

Something Old, Something New, Something Bottled, Something Brewed

The establishment has a ten-year history and a loyal following but ongoing creative changes should only encourage more people to flock to his hard to find nugget in the Brewery District.

This fresh and original version of CBC is well on track to be a dining destination for customers old and new.

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Columbus Monthly, September 2007

A Taste of Cuba by Maureen McGavin

At CBC Restaurant, the Cuban roasted chicken ($15.95) is marinated for 24 hours in a mix of vinegar, onions, garlic and spices, then seared and served with black beans and rice, fried plantains and charred yogurt salsa. “It’s not spicy, but it’s flavorful,” says Bret Hickman. “The black beans and vinegar bring out some contrasting flavors.” The dish is paired with the brewery’s own India Pale Ale, which is “very hoppy,” Hickman says. “It finishes with kind of a bite.”

 

Columbus Alive, November 8, 2007

by G. A. Benton

What's more, CBC sports a beer-friendly, something-for-everyone menu rife with smoky and spicy fare. CBC seems out to prove you can have your craft beer and eat a nice meal too.

Columbus Brewing Company conducts one of the best happy hours in Columbus, with reduced beer tariffs and half-priced appetizers ($4-$5)

And revisiting CBC is certainly no chore, not with its futuristic, industrial exterior that yields to a laidback and duskily lit copper and red interior flaunting an unusual tree leitmotif. There's also a large, almost Block-O-like red lacquered bar, the always friendly staff and those fab-tasting suds complementing high-performing brewpub grub. See, there is life beyond McPreFab chow and Corporate Lite.

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Columbus Alive, November 8, 2007

by G. A. Benton

What's more, CBC sports a beer-friendly, something-for-everyone menu rife with smoky and spicy fare. CBC seems out to prove you can have your craft beer and eat a nice meal too.

CBC Restaurant conducts one of the best happy hours in Columbus, with reduced beer tariffs and half-priced appetizers ($4-$5)

And revisiting CBC is certainly no chore, not with its futuristic, industrial exterior that yields to a laidback and duskily lit copper and red interior flaunting an unusual tree leitmotif. There's also a large, almost Block-O-like red lacquered bar, the always friendly staff and those fab-tasting suds complementing high-performing brewpub grub. See, there is life beyond McPreFab chow and Corporate Lite.

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We can host a wide variety of your events ranging from hosting your happy hour gathering to dinner for a group of 150 guests.

 

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